Windows on the World – a glimpse inside the World Trade Center in August 2001

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Categories:

history, Links, Worth a look


Konstantin Petrov - Windows on the World - August 2001
Konstantin Petrov – Windows on the World – August 2001

I never realized it until reading this New Yorker piece, but I have absolutely no idea about what the World Trade Center might have looked like on the inside. The only images that come to mind are of the Twin Towers standing, exploding, falling, or being jumped from. As described in Take Picture, a Talk of the Town piece in this week’s New Yorker, a young Estonian immigrant named Konstantin Petrov worked at Windows on the World, the restaurant at the top of the North Tower of the World Trade Center, and was an avid photographer.

Working the night shift, he’d take pictures with a point-and-shoot in the hallways and offices of the towers and of the banquet halls and dining room sitting empty and ready for the next day’s customers. It’s an odd little piece of photography that fills in a piece of my personal geography that I didn’t even know needed filling. Petrov worked the night of September 10th, and started driving home a little after 8am on the 11th. He noticed some debris as he was leaving, but didn’t know what happened until he’d gotten home. His pictures from inside the towers, some uploaded as late as August 2001, and from after the attack, are available on Petrov’s Fotki site, last updated around 12 years ago. A number of the images were used in a National Geographic documentary, 9/10: The Final Hours. This image seems to be a self-portrait of Petrov.

On the subject of images from inside the World Trade Center, seek out the documentary 9/11 (IMDB) by French filmmakers Jules and Gedeon Naudet and FDNY firefighter James Hanlon. The filmmakers had been following young firefighters in the Engine 7/Ladder 1/Battalion 1 Firehouse on Duane Street in Lower Manhattan for several months; the firehouse was one of the closest to the World Trade Center site. The filmmakers were there gathering footage on the morning of September 11th, and were among the first people on the scene after the first crash. Their footage in the documentary is the only video taken that morning from inside the Twin Towers. That footage, as papers and bodies fall to the ground outside the towers, is chilling.

By the way, Esquire’s article The Falling Man, a modern classic of long-form journalism, is now a fund-raiser for the James Foley Scholarship Fund at Marquette University. Read it now if you haven’t already. And if you have, read it again.

Legal battles continue over ownership of Vivian Maier’s work

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Categories:

art, industry, law, News


The legal case to determine whether Mr. Baille is Maier’s closest relative has now set in motion a process that Chicago officials say could take years and could result in Maier’s works’ being pulled from gallery inventories and museum shows until a determination is made.”
The Heir’s Not Apparent, New York Times

I wrote about the legal issues surrounding the rightful heir and owner of Vivian Maier‘s substantial body of work last year. The New York Times just published an overview of where the subject stands now, detailing a legal case filed in June 2014 which might force John Maloof and other owners of Maier’s negatives to cease publications and exhibitions of the work. In short, Virginia lawyer David C. Deal, himself a former photographer, thought that something wasn’t right in the way Maier’s copyright had been handled and searched for relatives of the nanny.

Screenshot of VivianMaier.com, the John Maloof collection
Screenshot of VivianMaier.com, the John Maloof collection

Maloof, owner of the largest collection of Maier’s negatives and prints (and producer and director of Finding Vivian Maier and countless exhibitions), had previously found a person in France who he’d thought was Maier’s closest living relative and agreed on an undisclosed settlement for the rights to the work. Deal believes he has found a closer relative of Maier’s, again in France, and now represents that person in a court case to determine whether or not he is the photographer’s closest heir. It’s a tangled case that will likely take years, but at the heart is a copyright issue.

The Vivian Maier industry (in the form of books, exhibitions, prints for sale, movies, television programs, and so on) is already worth millions of dollars. If this new possible heir is determined to be the rightful owner of the copyright, it could lead to substantial copyright infringement claims relating to most every instance of Vivian Maier’s work that has been seen in public. According to the New York Times, the state public administrator’s office in Cook County, Illinois, created an estate for Vivian Maier in July and warned Maloof and others selling the work that there may be future lawsuits over Maier’s work.

Hyperallergic also recently published a couple of articles regarding the legal issues surrounding Vivian Maier’s archive that are worth a read: Making Sense of the Legal Battle Over Vivian Maier’s Artworks and A Vivian Maier Collector Opens Up About Posthumous Printing, Maier’s Only Heir, and Her Legacy.

Buy prints to support A Photo A Day and go to GeekFest Sept. 12-14 in Philadelphia

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Categories:

Events, Friends, industry, Links


Support APAD by bidding on prints
Support APAD by bidding on prints

Both Matt and I have participated in the A Photo A Day community (APAD) over the years. It’s a wonderful community, run by Melissa Lyttle, of (mostly) photojournalists who look at each others’ work on an email listserv. Now, APAD has become a registered non-profit and will be offering grants to photographers to work on projects. I’m happy to see this development; money for projects is always a good thing. You can help out by bidding on prints from a wide-ranging group of photographers. The auction goes until September 16 and features the work of: Alan Berner, Barbara Davidson, Kendrick Brinson, Matt Eich, Preston Gannaway, Todd Heisler, Ariana Lindquist, Susana Raab, and others. For some of the work available, these are likely the lowest prices you’ll ever see. Check out the auction here.

A Photo A Day
APhotoADay

And while you’re at it, consider going to APAD’s annual GeekFest in Philadelphia Sept. 12 – 14, 2014. It’ll be my first GeekFest, but everything I hear about previous years is that it’s an experience not to be missed. For me, it will be an opportunity to finally meet many photographers around the US whom I’ve only known through email and social media. But even if you aren’t a member of APAD, it should be a great weekend. There’s a full roster of talks and presentations, including Ed Kashi, April Saul, Kainaz Amaria, Sara Lewkowicz, David Maialetti, Holly Andres, J. Kyle Keener, Luanne Dietz, and Vince Musi. Saturday night will also be the book launch of Sol Neelman’s Weird Sports 2.

As you can see from the schedule, it’s a full weekend, and if you buy a ticket this week, it’s only $100 (next week it goes to $125). You can get more details in the GeekFest Philly facebook group.