Tag Archive: black and white


Leica ad recreates scenes from Robert Capa’s life (and death)

Leica Alma from Sentimental on Vimeo.

This ad (above) is a few months old, but just came across my desk again. Made for the launch of the Leica M-Monochrom rangefinder at the Sao Paulo Leica store, it recreates vignettes from Robert Capa‘s life, including paratroopers landing at Normandy, his relationship with Gerda Taro, and his death by landmine in Indochina (and his final images). The spot is beautifully shot; there’s no wonder why it has won a number of industry awards.

Brauer’s in Moscow, Russia: Nov. 26 – Dec. 21

I’m very excited to announce that I will be participating in the first Young Media Professionals Exchange Program organized by the International Center for Journalists and Moscow Union of Journalists as part of a 2-year initiative between Russia and the US. The program is funded by a grant from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Twelve journalists from Russia will come to the US to work for a variety of news organizations here, and I will be one of 12 from the US who will live in Moscow from Nov. 26 to Dec. 21 working for a variety of Russian news organizations. I’ll be working for the ITAR-TASS Photo Agency, a Russian photo news service dating to 1926 when it was known as Photochronica TASS.

As such, I won’t be available for assignment work in the US until the end of December, but get in touch if you have any needs in Russia. I’ll primarily be in Moscow. You can leave a voicemail or SMS at (917) 512-3473 or contact me by email. I’ve already been in touch with a few of our readers in Russia to get together, but if you’re in Moscow, get in touch and I’d love to meet you.

It’s been nearly 10 years since I’ve been to Russia, though one of my university degrees is in Russian Language, Literature, and Culture. I wasn’t much of a photographer when I was there last, but you can see a few images from Vorkuta, Komi, Russia, in the gallery above. In addition to the work I’m doing there, I’ll be posting pictures during the trip to instagram and tumblr.

Erica McDonald’s “The Dark Light of This Nothing”

Erica McDonald wrote in a while back. I’ve been a fan of her work for a long time, having first met her through lightstalkers, and hoped she might have a project to share. The selection she sent back, from “The Dark Light of This Nothing” is a beautiful portrait of Brooklyn, both timeless and very much of this moment, a look into what rapidly changing socioeconomics means for the city and, by extension, the country. Here’s what McDonald writes about the project:

Janet: Hi Erica..(kiss)

Erica McDonald [EM]: Hi, Where’s Adele?

Janet: Adele’s inside..Erica, this is my family, that’s uh..Donny, my sister in law, Sharon, Angie…David and that’s my brother John..

EM: You’ve got a good memory.

Janet: I’ve got a good memory, I have 38 nieces and nephews, I have to..this is just a little quarter of it.

EM: I’m trying to get people to talk about what the neighborhood was like and what it is like now and..

Janet: You want some dessert? Steven would know that, my husband would know that, and so would Mary.

EM: No thanks, I’m okay. Yeah, Mary was just talking to me a little.

Anthony: I wasn’t born here..I don’t know anything..
Read on »

Remembering Dennis Hopper’s photography

Dennis Hopper, who has acted in many films I hold dear and who recently passed away, was a pretty great artist. His photos, beautiful black and white work from 1960s Los Angeles, has been collected and shown quite a bit and will be the centerpiece of the inaugural show this summer at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. There are quite a few of his photos on artnet and Taschen has published a collection, Dennis Hopper, Photographs 1961-1967. While the work often delves into the trap of celebrity photographers (behind the scenes of movies, famous people goofing around), there’s an obvious control of light and composition evident in Hopper’s work. The Guardian and the LA Times have recently discussed his photos. APhotoStudent recently looked into his work, and the Wooster Collective featured a video on Hopper’s photos, as well (update: thanks for those links, Matt).

(via Chasing Light)

Private #44 – “Real” by the photographers of Noor

Private issue 44 / Real by Noor -- Cover photo from Wars Water and Other Stories by Francesco Zizola

Private issue 44 / Real by Noor -- Cover photo from Wars Water and Other Stories by Francesco Zizola

The latest issue of Private features the work of the collective Noor. If you don’t know Private yet (it’s pronounced with a soft a and an accent on the ‘e’ — “Pri-vah-tay”), it’s a beautiful periodical feature portfolios of some of the best black and white photojournalism you’ve seen, issue after issue. The work this time around includes: Jan Grarup’s “A Silent Genocide”, Yuri Kozyrev’s “War Six Years After”, Philip Blenkinsop’s “Hmong”, Kadir van Lohuizen’s “The Nenets”, Pep Bonet’s “The Cult of San Lazaro”, Stanley Greene’s “Road to Ruin”, Samantha Appleton’s “Proxy War”, Jon Lowenstein’s “Shadow Lives”, and Francesco Zizola’s Wars Water and Other Stories.

Boogie’s “Belgrade Belongs to Me”

Matt’s mentioned the book here previously, but if you’re looking for a Boogie fix, Time’s just posted a selection from his new book, Belgrade Belongs to Me. Love this line in one of the cuts: “When Milosevic came to power in 1989, peopole thought he was going to resurrect Serbia to its former glory. It turned out he was just another self-serving Communist bastard.”

A Film vs. Digital Debate

I strongly believe that one is not ‘better’ than the other. They are different. And I think most photographers should use both, and it should depend on what kind of project they are working on and what they are trying to say. I switch between the two all of the time .. my Kosovo work is shot digitally and my long-running projects on Homelessness and New York City are shot on good old Tri-X film, all in 35mm format.

6x7 color negative from Lt. Nic Madrazo's service, part of Lutton's Graceland project

6x7 color negative from Lt. Nic Madrazo's service, part of Lutton's Graceland project



So, the question is, Which am I going to use for this project?

35mm from same scene.

35mm from same scene.

As I mentioned in this interview with Rachel Hulin for Nerve.com, I try hard to think about which medium I want to work in when starting a new project. To quote from the interview,

“When I shoot black and white things are dark and gritty, very much intentionally, and they compliment and draw things out of the subject matter. As I move forward I am approaching new stories that don’t have this feel to begin with, and it wouldn’t be natural to cloud it under an arbitrary choice of color vs. black and white. I want everything to compliment each other – tones, composition, and everything else. For me, longer and slower stories are ripe for the way I work with film but the faster pieces almost demand we shoot digital. And, for me, digital means color these days, as I’m still trying to get something that looks ‘right’ for me in grayscale (back to that feel that compliments), something that matches or surpasses what I get shooting black and white.”

35mm picture from Nic's service.

35mm picture from Nic's service.

6x7 of same scene, a moment before or later

6x7 of same scene, a moment before or later

I was referring there more to the choice between color and black and white, but this more or less amounts to the choice between film and digital for me. I think I’ll always have the mantra hammered into me as an intern at Black Star back in 2005… to paraphrase, ‘If you want it black and white, shoot it black and white!’. Meaning, of course, shooting it ‘right’ the first time, on black and white film. This applies to so much in photography (I also was smacked then in to learning to not crop pictures .. get it right when you click the shutter .. and this has stuck with me remarkably well except for extremely rare circumstances when I break from my rule .. like below on this post!): get it right the first time and don’t rely and get dependent on photoshop ‘fixes’.

As I mentioned rather furtively earlier on DVA, I’m starting work on a new project called ‘Graceland’, about America today and the stories we’re missing or ignoring due to the election cycle and wars. My original thought was that this project had to be shot on film, in color, and in a new format for me, 6×7.

A lot of things went in to this decision … I wanted something that looked new, and stood out from, the work I have done before. I’ve been shooting the color digital (Kosovo) and gritty black and white film (Homeless, I See A Darkness) for awhile, and wanted something that stood out from that work both in ‘feel’ and ‘impact’. I felt a larger negative, in a new perspective and format, would accomplish that. I also was interested in exploring how medium format (which I haven’t shot since ’05) would change my approach to photographing, and how that would impact how the pictures looked, and were interpreted. I’ve been looking a lot at art-editorial shooters lately (hard to define or give examples off.. think Ziyah Gafic, Mikhael Subotzky, Simon Norfolk, Alec Soth and Alessandra Sanguinetti, amongst so many more) and I wanted to explore. So, I started shooting test rolls on a rented Mamiya 7 and eventually took one to my first real shoots of the project, the Boeing Strike and Lt. Madrazo’s funeral.

Nic's service, digital 35mm file.

Nic's service, digital 35mm file.

Partly as a backup, partly for ‘deadline’ sake (I was thinking of immediate turnaround for news publications), I also shot digital at these events, and it has turned out to be a lucky blessing. After getting my 220 film back and spending time and money getting it scanned, I was rather underwhelmed. Maybe I wasn’t giving it enough time to push myself with a new piece of equipment requiring a different method, but my first few rolls did not have that feel that I was looking for.. that new thing that would really distinguish this project from my other work. There wasn’t hardly anything different between the film and digital except for the format (35mm vs. 6×7). The color, perspective, depth and much more importantly how I was working with the scene were not changed from everything I had done before. Why is that? I can’t really say.

The rare better picture, from a cropped 6x7 negative.

The rare better picture, from a cropped 6x7 negative.

There is more backstory to getting this Graceland project, which I hope to get to at some point, but suffice now to say that it has been a struggle to find funding and outlet for the work. To date, wholly unsuccessful. So when it came time last week to get ready for a shoot in Eastern Washington at an apple orchard I had to decide whether or not it was worth it to continue shooting film (at $35/day rental for the camera, $10/roll (20 pictures) for film plus $11 per roll developing, and 15min per frame to scan) on an unfunded project. Given my apprehension about whether or not this new format was impacting the final product, it was a clearer decision to go strictly with digital. In many ways, I felt I had to: the investment, in time and money, in shooting film was not paying off. An experiment that failed my assumptions, but I must still go forward, as I believe in the story (as M. Scott said after reading a draft of this, he thinks of these debates are concerning ‘packaging, rather than substance’. of course, but the packaging must be considered and utilized to its fullest extent. I quote, paraphrasing again, Paolo at the Oslo Magnum workshop, “We’re photographers. Aesthetics are all we have got”, meaning, I think, that we’re working in visual medium and have to grab our audience in the most efficient and important ways, and that will be done visually)

So, I might have to toss, or crop (something I do only as a final, regrettable resort), some of the medium format frames to fit in to the new edit, but I’ll be able to work more cheaply and certainly quicker. I wish I could have pushed the 6×7 further, and I hope to try it (or square! can’t wait to work with it again) again soon.. probably when I get some funding behind me.

Worker in the processing plant of the Phillippi Fruit Company.

Worker in the processing plant of the Phillippi Fruit Company.

So when I headed out last week to photograph the apple farm and its migrant workers, I only had my digital camera with me, shooting in my ‘normal’ way. “Graceland” will now be some extension of the method of my Kosovo work, for better or worse. We’ll have to wait for a while longer to see how it all looks together. For another post is that crazy process of conception to individual days and shoots to the final production of a story. I’m always amazed at how it works out.

Leaving my neighborhood for the 3hour drive to Wenatchee, Washington to photograph an apple farm.

Leaving my neighborhood for the 3hour drive to Wenatchee, Washington to photograph an apple farm.

(maybe you could guess, this last picture is a loving nod to my favorite Eugene Richards book, “Americans We”. The best link is to go to his webpage, go to ‘Books’ and click to see the spreads. I hope I can one day accomplish something as important as this book, in the same way that Richards dedicates his book to Robert Frank)