NYC Event: Media law for independent journalists

Media Law for Journalists : Workshop and Roundtable - April 26, 2016
Media Law for Journalists : Workshop and Roundtable – April 26, 2016

There’s an interesting workshop being held April 26, 2016, at the New York Times building, focusing on media law for journalists who don’t have a newsroom legal department to depend on.

I don’t know anything about the Media Law Resource Center, who are organizing the workshop, but the event is cheap and includes lunch. The event website says editors and writers from Buzzfeed, Gawker, CNN, and the New York Times, will be there and panels will cover the following topics: How Journalists Get Into Trouble, Newsgathering, Your Relationship with Sources and Understanding the Reporters’ Privilege, Digital Law, Protecting Yourself: Insurance and Lawyers, and a roundtable discussion.

These are topics that are incredibly important, but hard to learn. Even if you studied these topics in journalism school, it’s probably worth spending $15 on a refresher course. These sorts of things can change quickly with new technology and new types of journalism.

Register for the workshop here.

Sohrab Hura joins Magnum: “Life is Elsewhere”

Sohrab Hura is one of the photographers whose work I’ve been eagering following closely for years, going back to when Scott and I first saw his work on Flickr. His earlier photos are reminiscent of traditional black and white reportage but his deeply personal project “Life is Elsewhere” has grown into a fantastic, impressionistic style. We, and many others, were very excited to learn a few weeks ago that Hura had joined Magnum Photos as a nominee (Magnum’s Press Release). His “Life is Elsewhere” project has recently been published on the Magnum website and offers us all a chance to admire a extended edit of this work.

India. 2007. My first time playing Holi in Vrindavan. (c) Sohrab Hura / Magnum

… My Life is Elsewhere is a journal of my life, my family, my love, my friends, my travels, my sheer need to experience all that is about to disappear and so in a way I’m attempting to connect my own life with the world that I see with a hope to find my reality in it.” – Sohrab Hura

Hura offers an interesting description of his book: “Life is Elsewhere is a book of contradictions and of doubts and understandings and of laughter and forgetting in which I am trying to constantly question myself by simply documenting the broken fragments of my life which might seem completely disconnected to one another on their own. But I hope that in time I am able to piece together this wonderful jigsaw puzzle called life. And this journey will perhaps lead to reconciliation with my own life.”

Invisible Photographer Asia has an extended interview with Hura that was published earlier this month after the Magnum announcement. It offers a lot of insight into Hura’s work and motivation, how he has edited his work, as well as a glimpse at newer projects.

Hura’s biography from Magnum:

“Sohrab Hura was born on 17th October 1981 in a small town called Chinsurah in West Bengal, India and he grew up changing his ambitions from one exciting thing to another. He started with dreams of growing up and becoming a dog, which later turned to becoming a superhero and then to a veterinarian to a herpetologist to becoming a wild life film maker. Today he is a photographer, after having completed his Masters in Economics. He is currently the coordinator of the Anjali House children’s photography workshop that takes place during the Angkor Photo Festival, Cambodia every year and his home base is New Delhi, India.”

Congratulations to Sohrab! We are looking forward to seeing more of your work gain a wider audience.

Also worth checking out, if you haven’t already, is Prasiit Sthapit’s “Change of Course”, a project recommended by Hura to Dvafoto last year. Sthapit was one of Sohrab’s students in a workshop in Kathmandu in 2012.

The New York Photography Portfolio Review: Interview with James Estrin

Yesterday James Estrin, co-Editor of the New York Times Lens Blog and Staff Photographer for the Times, announced that they are inaugurating the first New York Photography Portfolio Review, a two-day event in April 2013. It will bring together 160 photographers, in two one-day sessions, with more than 50 prominent reviewers, including a diverse selection of photo editors, agents, publishers, curators and buyers. The event will include private portfolio reviews, discussions and workshops.

They’ve also announced that the event will be free to attend for invited photographers, a step away from other major portfolio reviews in the US and Europe which can cost hundreds of dollars. The event, on April 13 and 14 at the City University of New York Graduate School of Journalism in New York City, is divided in two sessions: on Saturday the 100 invited photographers will all be 21 years or older, and on Sunday all 60 photographers will be aged 18-27. To attend you must submit a portfolio by February 13, and invited photographers will be informed by March 8, 2013.

This is such an interesting event that I wanted to pose a few questions to Estrin, and he agreed to fill us in.

The New York Times Lens Blog.
The New York Times Lens Blog.

Dvafoto: Whose idea was this project, and how does it fit Lens’ and the NYT’s goals?

Estrin: I’ve always thought that the web, and social media were very powerful tools for communication, but significantly different than actual human interaction. Real Analogue interaction can have important and profound consequences.

I came up with the idea for the review with Lens co-editor David Gonzalez.

We have been lucky that our marching orders, from our boss [assistant managing editor for photography for the New York Times] Michele McNally, have always been to make the very best blog we could. Make the best editorial judgements that we could make, be willing to be smart, try to be principaled and don’t worry about traffic or business. So if this event can help the photo community, and create opportunities and discussion, then it fits into our mission. There are many ways to communicate.

Why did you choose to make the event free? This surely bucks the trend of most portfolio reviews and events for photographers these days.

It’s free because we wanted to create as many opportunities for photographers, regardless of background, to share their work.
There are fine portfolio reviews that charge- most of them non profit either by design or execution. I reviewed this year at Review Santa Fe and also at Lens Culture Fotofest in Paris and I think both were very was helpful for many photographers as well as for myself as an editor. At the same time I think we all have a responsibility to our fellow photographers, particularly the youngest new photographers amongst us.

Many people helped me when I was a young freelance photographer. I wouldn’t be here without them. I always remember how difficult it was to show my work in the pre-digital era, and how alone I often felt. There is an important tradition of experienced photographers helping newer ones.

Why the age categories? Will there be a different curriculum for each session?

The age categories are because I wanted to make sure that we did the utmost we could for up and coming photographers.
All photographers 21 and older can go on Saturday and I think the opportunities will be great. But on Sunday you have to be 18 -27 and there will be many workshops as well as reviews. By the way a very accomplished 21 -27 year old photographer could apply and get in for both days.

Ultimately, we just wanted to do some good, have fun, and help our colleagues in any way that we can. So we asked what would be a meaningful thing to do.

My colleagues from the New York Times, National Geographic, Time, Aperture, Abrams books, PDN, and many museums, magazines, galleries and blogs have generously agreed to share their time. We are adding new reviewers daily.

Thanks to James Estrin for answering some of our questions and for organizing this fantastic opportunity for photographers.

The deadline for submitting your portfolio is February 13, 2013 on the entry page. Good luck to everyone applying!