The Talent: Stefan Djordjevic

I’ve known Stefan – or Steki to his friends – for a few years through mutual friends in Belgrade. I first met him at a screening of the Serbian film Tilva Roš, which was a dramatization of his real life experience growing up in the city of Bor, Serbia. In part because of his experience on set and becoming friends with the filmmakers, Stefan decided to go to film school and pursue cinematography and documentary photography. He recently showed me a short film he made in Bor, and it was enchanting.

“Journey” is a story about an engine driver who travels the same route for eight hours a day. He doesn’t see that route in the same way we experience it, because the imagination is the only thing he has in his monotonous surroundings.


Stefan Djordjevic was born in Bor, a copper mine town in Eastern Serbia, where he started in the skateboarding scene with couple of friends. Their story was documented in the feature movie called Tilva Roš, directed by Nikola Lezaic. He is currently studying cinematography on Faculty of Dramatic Arts. He always had a passion for documentary photography.

See more of Stefan Djordjevic’s work on his Instagram or Vimeo pages.

We receive a lot of submissions of projects to feature on dvafoto and we want to highlight some of the fantastic work we see. Please get in contact if you have a body of work you’d like to share.

The Talent: Fan Shi San’s “Great Wall”

I connected with Fan Shi San on Blink and fell in love with the series “Great Wall.” It’s a look at the landmark like you’ve probably never seen before, captured while the photographer bicycled the 4000-mile length from west to east. He is a freelance photographer based in Shanghai whose work has been exhibited in China and the UK over the past few years.

In Fan Shi San’s own words, “For thousands of years the Great Wall sealed China from outside world, dynasty after dynasty, empire after empire, it is the blood line along which millions of human skeletons buried without intermission during thousands years’ struggle. This journey is a visual research of China’s essential roots through desert and towns, symbols and villages which are slowly dying in the progress of the reborn country’s industrialization and urbanization, millions of faceless men migrant from north to south, from interior to coast, searching for a better life, leaving behind their native soil, their children and olds, and in the meantime, the Great Wall crumbles a little more every day.”

When I asked him why he shot this project, Fan Shi San said the motivation to photograph this body of work was a desire to “record the internal scene in China, both in landscape and spiritually.”

There’s a much larger edit of “Great Wall” available on Fan Shi San’s website, where you can also see Wu Kan, a look at a small farming village that rebelled against the Communist Party in 2011, and Two of Us, a conceptual piece on children who grew up alone under China’s One Child Policy.

We receive a lot of submissions of projects to feature on dvafoto and we want to highlight some of the fantastic work we see. Please get in contact if you have a body of work you’d like to share.

The Talent: Jacque Foo

We receive a lot of submissions of projects to feature on Dvafoto and we want to highlight some of the fantastic work we see. Today we would like to share “Family Day” by Jacque Foo.

The work is presented without captions, but with this introduction written by Foo:

“For many male expat workers in Qatar, Friday is their only rest day.

Friday is also the “Family Day” for many places like public parks, shopping malls, markets, promenade etc. During this day, these places are open for families only – any men without female companion are considered “bachelors” and are not allowed to enter.

Anyone who visits these places on Friday will be familiar with the scene of security guards or police asking bachelors from Asia to leave, but keeping a blind eye to men from the local and Gulf region or Western countries.

As a Malaysian man living in Doha, the scenario above is a common experience for me. Many times I, together with other Asian bachelors, have been told to leave these places while seeing Arab or Caucasian bachelors walking freely to wherever they want to go.

This experience led me to wonder where these bachelors spend their rest day given there are limited places to go on Friday. I hence started following these men to places where they hang out with my camera, and the result is this series he called “Family Day”, containing photos taken between September 2013 and June 2014.”

For more information about Foo and his work, visit his website.