Category Archive: Links


Getty gives away 35 million photos and people don’t like it

Getty’s latest move in the stock photography market has been met with shock and horror. 35 million of Getty’s images are now free to embed, unwatermarked, for “noncommercial use,” which includes websites that run advertisements (see the image embedded above). In an interview with PDNPulse, Craig Peters, Senior Vice President of Business Development, Marketing at Content Images at Getty, says that while there is no current plan for this embed system to result in money going to photographers, at some future point, Getty might add advertising into the embedded images (as YouTube does) and photographers would get a cut of that. “This is their content, and if we generate any revenue from that content, we not only have the obligation, but we have every intent to share that revenue,” he said.

You can search the archive of embeddable images here at Getty’s site.

Here’s a collection of reactions to the news from around the photography world. Unsurprisingly, people are not excited about this development:

Regarding all of this, I’ve seen a few photographers on facebook saying they’re pulling their images from Getty’s collections. I don’t have any images available through Getty, but if the past is any indication (Hume be damned), other stock houses will likely follow Getty’s lead. Keep an eye on this. I think Todd Bigelow and John Harrington are correct that Getty’s interest in making these images out for free is the browsing data that surrounds the image. Licensing directly to blogs for small fees hasn’t really worked out, if you remember the Associated Press debacle a few years back, but getting (and selling) analytics relating to image usage is likely worth a lot.

In other Getty news, the Getty/Flickr licensing partnership started in 2008 will be terminated at the end of current content agreement. PetaPixel has the details, which makes it sound like this is just temporary as the Yahoo/Flickr and Getty work out details for a new agreement.

Book recommendation: The Sochi Project’s An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus - Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen (Aperture)

An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus – Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen (Aperture)

With only a few days left of the Sochi Olympics, I can’t say that I’ve been impressed by American television coverage of the games. The sports coverage has been on par with NBC’s usual broadcasting. But I knew the other coverage (looking at Russia’s culture, politics, economy, etc.) would be bad when an NBC commentator didn’t explain symbolism during the opening ceremonies and instead told viewers to “google it.” I loved the opening ceremonies (having been a student of Russian history and culture), but there were serious omissions.

One of the most comprehensive resources I’ve found on everything surrounding the games, from what Sochi was to what it has become to what’s going on in nearby regions, is The Sochi Project‘s An Atlas of War and Tourism in Caucasus by Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen, published by Aperture. They’ve just posted on Facebook that the first edition is 85% sold out. That’s no small feat for a huge art book with 4500 copies. The book is available (alongside other publications by the pair) in The Sochi Project’s online store or through the Aperture website. The cheapest price to be had is through Amazon ($57 as of this writing), where only a handful of copies remain in stock, though more are on the way.

Don’t let the book cover fool you (my girlfriend hates it!). This is a serious document, the end product of 7 years documenting the region. There are great bite-sized briefs on many of the surrounding regions and histories interspersed among excellent and incisive photography and writing of Hornstra and van Bruggen. For a centuries-old conflict (and the current rat’s nest of corruption and crime), the book is an astonishing accomplishment. At over 400 pages, it isn’t easy to digest. I’ve taken to working through short sections day by day in addition to just leafing through it. Don’t take my word for it, though. Joerg Colberg called it “Highly recommended” in his review, or see what the New York Review of Books had to say, or Slate, or Fast Company, or Mother Jones, or the Guardian, among others.

Make sure to also spend time with the entire Sochi Project website. I find the book to be a more accessible way of viewing this project, but the website has a lot that isn’t included in An Atlas of War and Tourism in Caucasus. By the way, both Hornstra and van Bruggen have been banned from Russia, which we wrote about previously.

You might also be interested in previous posts about Hornstra and the Sochi Project on dvafoto, going back to 2008:

And on the subject of Sochi, my favorite reporting on the games has been by The New Republic’s Julia Ioffe (link to author; link to TNR’s Sochi reporting, which includes other authors). Check out: Evgeni Plushenko Pulls Out of the Olympics, Proving That Corruption Is Bad or The Only People Harassing the Gays of Sochi are the Foreign Journalists or Russians Think We’re Engaging in Olympic Schadenfreude. They’re Right. or Why Did Someone Put a Giant Wooden Cock on a Kremlin Critic’s Car? And be sure to check out the New York Times’ An Olympics in the Shadow of a War Zone and Sochi or Bust: Have Niva, Need Hammer. I’ve also enjoyed the Guardian’s coverage of the sports themselves, including Sochi 2014: 10 high contrast shots at the Winter Olympics – in pictures.

By the way, if you click through our links to buy anything here, we get a small cut of the sale. It’s a way for us to keep the lights on here at dvafoto. Thanks to those of you who have clicked through us in the past! Consider bookmarking this link to Amazon. It doesn’t change prices for you and gives a small portion of the sale to dvafoto.

Need a laugh? Watch this photo crew work in Zero G

The video above is hilarious. Of course, Sports Illustrated’s annual Swimsuit Issue has a lot of…issues. This year Barbie was in the mix. Last year, the magazine featured “exotic” locals alongside swimsuit models. But forget the controversies for a minute, and instead marvel at the photo crew (photographers, grips, makeup artists, warddrobe assistants, etc.) trying to produce a photo shoot without the benefit of gravity.

Sports Illustrated behind the scenes video

Sports Illustrated behind the scenes video – screenshot

This year, model Kate Upton was photographed in zero gravity, on one of the so-called “Vomit Comets.” Photographer James Macari and his crew do an admirable job floating through space and trying to control hair, water droplets, and themselves, in zero gravity. Upton also has an impressive amount of control of her expressions and body while being photographed in zero g. You can see the resulting photos here, but really the video above is all you need. You can see this video and another at Sports Grid.

(via metafilter)

First-world problems or real problems? Western journalists are whining about Sochi Olympics hotels (updated)


I’ve spent about 10 months in Russia over the past eight or nine years, in Moscow and Saint Petersburg, but also in more remote cities such as Vorkuta, Ufa, Petrozavodsk, and Voronezh. Even in Moscow, where the hotel stood next to the Russian Foreign Ministry and the rooms was listed at about $175/night, there were substantial issues with water and heat.

Travel in Russia is not easy, and that’s why some of the viral complaints by journalists at the Sochi Olympics seem naive and privileged. Much of the world can’t flush toilet paper down the toilet. Much of the world can’t depend on clean water. Much of the world doesn’t have American breakfast food in the morning.

But there are valid issues coming through in the reports from the media village in Sochi. There are security issues. Some of the water is unfit even for bathing (West Virginia knows about that all too well). Much of the infrastructure is unfinished. There are stray dogs in hotels. By connecting to wifi in the Olympic village, you can be assured that your computer will be hacked and your data will be stolen. (See Update II below)

The Washington Post has the largest collection of journalists’ complaints about their hotels, calling the experiences “hilarious and gross.” Deadspin got in on the act, saying “Staying in Sochi is a Hilarious Adventure.” The Wire has a wonderful analysis of some of these complaints, classifying them either as “real problem” or “first-world problem.” Can’t flush the toilet paper? First-world problem. Water unfit for bathing? Real problem. Margaret Coker, blogging for the Wall Street Journal, tells journalists to stop complaining, offering a good read on the scope of these complaints.

In fact, many of the images purported to be from the Sochi Olympics site are not from Sochi or Russia at all. The Telegraph leads their story about these complaints with a picture of three office chairs facing a toilet. Gizmodo busts some of these photos, finding that many of them have been passed around online for a year or more. The Wire has a similar analysis.

As usual, BagNews has a deeper read on what these reports mean, warning that by saturating news sites with “hilarious” (and sometimes fake) complaints about hotel conditions, readers and viewers lose sight of the real issues surrounding these Olympic Games. Real infrastructure problems need to be reported, but so does the conflict in areas close to the Olympics, Russia’s abuse of human rights, corruption in the construction and production of the Sochi Olympics, and anti-gay legislation and sentiment in the country. These issues deserve the media attention now being diverted to pictures of toilets.

UPDATE: Dmitry Kozak, the deputy prime minister responsible for the Olympic preparations, told the Wall Street Journal that they have surveillance footage of shower usage in journalists’ hotel rooms. A spokesman for Kozak quickly said they don’t have footage of anyone in showers or hotel rooms.

UPDATE II: The reports about Sochi wifi hacking seem to be exaggerated. Vice’s Motherboard site has a deeper look at NBC’s report, which served as the basis for the Yahoo piece linked above. The device infection demonstrations were done in Moscow and required the user to click on malware on a website, just as would happen anywhere in the world. The Trend Micro security expert in the NBC piece has a blog post and white paper detailing the method of infection used in his demonstrations.

David Guttenfelder in North Korea

“This is it. This is your country. This is what I saw.” – David Guttenfelder




David Guttenfelder, Associated Press Chief Photographer in Asia, has made 30 trips and stayed 100 days in North Korea, one of few Western photographers with regular access to the isolated country. The AP was the first news organization to open a bureau in Pyongyang, in January 2012. Guttenfelder, an American photographer who has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize seven times and has won seven World Press Photo awards, oversees the bureau’s photography and staff.

He posts regularly on his instagram account (@dguttenfelder), including images transmitted directly from the streets of Pyongyang since he was first allowed to bring a cell phone in to the country in February 2013. Just Something magazine published a blog with 41 of his instagram images that are well worth checking out; the feeling we get with instagram and mobile photography – casual, personal, instant – is very interestingly applied in the context of the “hermit kingdom”. These are not images we’ve seen before.

Guttenfelder is in a unique position to document a country that had almost no independent photographic record for 60 years, and luckily for all of us he is doing a wonderful job and is very eloquent about what he is trying to accomplish. National Geographic, who recently sent him on assignment in North Korea, invited him to speak at a recent National Geographic Live! event, and they’ve published a video of his talk.

After earlier comparing his vision of North Korea on his first trips to the country to the movie The Truman Show he talks about his mission as “trying to interpret reality, trying to reveal what is real inside the country.”

North Koreans ride an escalator past a model of the country’s Unha-3 rocket as they enter an exhibition in #Pyongyang of #Kimjongilia flowers named after the late leader Kim Jong Il. (c) David Guttenfelder.

This is one of the more inspiring videos about photography and how it can be used that I’ve seen in recent memory.

Trent Parke’s Minutes to Midnight (possibly) available at Amazon

Trent Parke - Minutes to Midnight (Steidl)

Trent Parke – Minutes to Midnight (Steidl)

Trent Parke‘s books are hard to find. When Alec Soth’s Little Brown Mushroom published the weird little Bedknobs and Broomsticks, the $18 limited edition book quickly sold out and secondhand copies showed up on ebay for $200. Now, Parke’s 2012 book (first published as 19 photos in 2005 by Filigranes Editions), Minutes to Midnight, published by Steidl, appears to be out of stock everywhere. Photoeye has it for $75 on backorder. Magnum has the book for $150 with a proviso that “price will increase as stock sells out.” However, there’s a possible workaround at Amazon.

Minutes to Midnight is listed at Amazon for $33.88 + shipping. The page says that the book is temporarily out of stock, but last week a friend on Facebook said that theirs had shipped. I ordered one on a whim a couple days ago, and just received confirmation that the book has shipped and will be delivered this week. Amazon won’t charge you until it’s ready to ship an item, and you can cancel at any time, so it’s worth placing an order in case they get some more copies in.

You can see images from the project, a roadtrip across Australia starting in 2003, on the Magnum site.

Parke’s previous books, Dream/Life, the Seventh Wave (with wife Narelle Autio), and the Christmas Tree Bucket, are sort of available on Amazon. Dream/Life (images) is $1595, the Seventh Wave (images) is $690, and the Christmas Tree Bucket (images) is only $30.53, as of this writing.

Previously on dvafoto: Two Looks: Trent Parke and Narelle Autio, Trent Parke and Narelle Autio at work, Parke talks about his process for a recent award.

By the way, if you click through our links to buy anything here, we get a small cut of the sale. It’s a way for us to keep the lights on here at dvafoto. Thanks to those of you who have clicked through us in the past! Consider bookmarking this link to Amazon. It doesn’t change prices for you and gives a small portion of the sale to dvafoto.

Worth a Look: Adam Magyar’s Stainless

Photographer Adam Magyar, whose slit-camera photographs Scott wrote about in 2009, has a new project called Stainless. It is composed of both massive prints of subway cars and subway riders and innovative slow-motion videos of subway platforms as trains arrive at stations around the world. It is captivating work. And involved a tremendous amount of ingenuity and invention by Magyar to make it possible.

There have been a lot of articles about the work recently so do have a look: Matter has published a feature and interview with Magyar as Einstein’s Camera: How one renegade photographer is hacking the concept of time that I highly recommend. PetaPixel also published a piece about the Stainless videos and followed-up with a link to a fascinating video where Magyar speaks about the technology and code that he developed himself to make these projects work.

FAA says drone photojournalism illegal…for now

Spokesman-Review video made using drone photography.

Spokesman-Review video made using drone photography.

On January 1, the Spokesman-Review (of Spokane, Washington) published a video of the city’s annual Polar Bear Plunge. A portion of the video was taken with a remote-controlled helicopter. Though a small helicopter doesn’t match what most of have in our minds when we think of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), for legal purposes they are the same thing. News of the Spokesman-Review’s video spread widely after a few tweets, with some questioning the legality of using a UAV for journalism in the US. The Spokesman-Review photographer responsible for the video, Jesse Tinsley, said the use fell into a legal gray area. Poynter has a good review of the conversation and an interview with Tinsley. But on Monday, an FAA spokesperson said that there is no legal gray area regarding drone journalism. “If you’re using it for any sort of commercial purposes, including journalism, that’s not allowed,” the FAA told Poynter. In June of 2013, in fact, the FAA sent cease-and-desist letters to two American drone journalism university programs, the University of Missouri’s Missouri Drone Journalism Program and the University of Nebraska’s Drone Journalism Lab. Check out the Drone Journalism Lab’s tumblr, by the way.

RC copters with camera mounts are a growing industry. You can buy them at Amazon. DJI Innovations has a handful of other models available, too. As a result, drone journalism is taking off around the world, alongside other nonmilitary drone usage. Livestreaming Occupy WallStreet journalists used toy helicopters to gather aerial footage. Paparazzi have used drones in their celebrity coverage, leading to an anti-drone anti-paparazzi bill in California. Eric Cheng, formerly of Lytro, spoke with Popular Photography about using drones in his work. Even wedding photographers are getting into the mix, but sometimes with disastrous results (see the video below).

The use of drones in journalism (and everything else) will only increase. The Reuters Institute released a report in June 2013 on just this subject (pdf of report). In the report, they argue that newspapers, magazines, and broadcasters, will turn to drones because they vastly simplify and cheapen the process of collecting aerial photography. The Canadian Journalism Project has a good interview with Alexandra Gibb, a graduate student whose thesis addresses the use and future potential of drones in journalism. And Poynter has a nice set of links and discussion about what journalists need to know about drones, though that focuses more on the coverage of drone issues than use of drones by journalists.

Not everyone’s happy about the rise of drones. The ACLU warns about risks to privacy and safety caused by the increasing use of drones in domestic security issues. And one Colorado town made national news last year with a proposal to issue hunting licenses and bounties to shoot down drones in the town’s airspace.

And while the use of drones for commercial operations, including journalism, remains illegal in the US now, the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 says that the FAA needs to allow drones and UAVs in American airspace by September 2015. To that end, the FAA has announced plans for six drone test sites around the country which will be used to determine how to integrate drones into the nation’s airspace by experimenting in varied locations and climates.

Questions remain after death of 17-year-old Reuters stringer

Bloody cameras posted alongside announcement of the death of 17-year-old Molhem Barakat, a Reuters stringer

Bloody cameras posted alongside announcement of the death of 17-year-old Molhem Barakat, a Reuters stringer – posted to twitter by DitaaSely

I first heard about the death of Molhem Barakat in Syria by way of the above image posted to twitter on Dec. 21. Barakat was killed while covering fighting between rebels and loyalists over the Kindi Hospital in Aleppo, Syria. Covering Syria has been an especially dangerous endeavour for journalists. The Committee to Protect Journalists, as of this writing, states that 55 journalists have been killed in the country since 1992, all in the past 3 years. However, Barakat’s death raises even more questions.

Many of the reports of Barakat’s death state that he was 17 years old. Reuters has not confirmed this, but nor has the media organization given any age. As usual, duckrabbit is on the case, with a large set of links surrounding Molhem Barakat. British journalist Hannah Lucinda Smith wrote a remembrance for the boy, whom she’d known over the past year. She first wrote about him in an interesting, and provocative, piece called “My friend, the aspiring suicide bomber.” When the boy couldn’t join an Al Qaeda-linked group in Syria, he turned to Reuters to freelance. He was accepted. His work was good, used to accompany articles by major media outlets. Buzzfeed has a collection of some of his most powerful work from the conflict.

But many have been asking just what a 17-year-old was doing working for one of the largest media organizations in one of the most dangerous conflicts in recent history, especially for journalists. NPR’s On the Media broadcast a tremendous piece last September called “The Freelancers’ War,” which lays out what coverage of Syria really means. Although some media organizations have banned the use of reporting from Syria by freelancers, the vast majority of reporting from the conflict remains the domain of freelancers. For some, it’s war tourism. Vice had a particularly telling piece in 2012 called “I went to Syria to learn how to be a journalist.” The freelancers face extreme danger without insurance, training, adequate gear, institutional backing, or even a plan for what to do when things go bad.

After the news of Barakat’s death, people have been wondering why the organization hired a 17-year-old to work in this danger. Corey Pein’s blog post covers the important issues, and includes an empty response from Reuters received by Stuart Hughes.

So the questions remain:

  • Was Molhem Barakat 17 when working for Reuters?
  • If so, why is a child working for one of the largest media organizations in the world?
  • Why would a media organization hire someone who had previously tried to join Al Qaeda?
  • Did Reuters provide the expensive camera gear to Barakat?
  • What was the agreement between Reuters and the 17-year-old? Was he given safety equipment, training, insurance? What about assistance for his family?
  • Does Reuters, or other news organization, regularly employ people under 18 when covering conflict? If not, why now?

Corey Pein has many more questions, all of which demand an answer.

Worth a look: Women in Photography and the conversation about sexism in editorial photography

WomeninPhoto.com - screenshot 9 December 2013

WomeninPhoto.com – screenshot 9 December 2013

It would seem that the biggest magazines with the most hiring power hire mostly male photographers. -Daniel Shea

In September, Daniel Shea provoked quite the conversation with a post on his tumblr called “On Sexism in Editorial Photography.” We reblogged the original post on our tumblr but due to travel and assignment work never got around to a roundup on the main blog here. One great result of the conversation is Women In Photo, which collects the online conversation about these issues and presents a list of American and international women photographers that any editor shouldn’t hesitate to hire for assignment work. It’s a work in progress, with a few names I like left out (Melissa Golden, Melissa Lyttle, Alixandra Fazzina, Vivian Sassen, Sandy Kim, Ariel Zambelich, Megan Spelman, Narelle Autio, Krisanne Johnson, Carolyn Drake, Nadia Shira Cohen, Sim Chi Yin, Anastasia Taylor Lind, Jessica Dimmock, Stephanie Sinclair, Lynsey Addario), but it’s a great resource so far.

Shea pointed out that the biggest magazines have mostly female editors and hire mostly male photographers and presented a few observations and thoughts about why this situations has arisen, none of which he claims to be exhaustive or anything more than his own experience: editors say they don’t know female photographers who fit their magazine’s style; men might be more aggressive in pursuing assignment work; collectives and loose organizations of photographers don’t do a good job of including women; men have an easier time assisting due to sexism and climbing the ranks that way. The whole post is worth a read. Another particularly troubling statistic that saw recently that likely has a profound affect: 64% of women journalists responding to a survey said they had experienced “intimidation, threats, or abuse” in the field or in the office. That study was conducted by the International Women’s Media Foundation.

Women In Photography also collects much of the rest of the conversation started by Shea and discussion about the conversation. There are responses by editors, photographers, and industry publications. Here’s a few I liked:

Be sure to take a look at National Geographic’s Women of Vision exhibit and Proof’s recent post about Alexandra Boulat.

Firecracker does a great job finding and highlighting the work of European women photographers (featured on dvafoto previously), and offers an annual grant. There’s also the Women Photojournalists of Washington and their annual contest.

Buzzfeed also had a wonderful post a little while back: Women Are Covering The Hell Out Of The Syria War — So Why Haven’t You Noticed?

Also, a similar conversation went around photojournalism circles in 2011, during which we had a guest post on gender and photojournalism by Melissa Golden.

And check out the International Women’s Media Foundation.

While we’re on this subject, I imagine that we could have a very similar conversation about racial and ethnic diversity in the photo industry…