AFP publishes strategy for covering ISIS, states agency will no longer work with freelancers in Syria

[I]f someone travels to Syria and offers us images or information when they return, we will not use it.”
AFP Global News Director Michèle Léridon, Covering the “Islamic State”

Agence France-Presse’s Global News Director Michèle Léridon just published a fascinating article on how the wire service covers the emerging Islamic State (ISIS or ISIL) on AFP’s Correspondent blog. AFP is currently the only international news agency with a bureau in Damascus. Since August 2013, AFP has stopped sending their journalists to rebel-held territories within Syria. The post also says, “we no longer accept work from freelance journalists who travel to places where we ourselves would not venture….[I]f someone travels to Syria and offers us images or information when they return, we will not use it.”

The rest of Léridon’s post details how AFP handles handout pictures from ISIS, AFP’s efforts to find images of ISIS’ victims’ lives before their deaths, and what language to use in coverage of the region. For those of you like me who find media studies interesting, the post is worth reading for the peek it gives behind the curtain of covering one of the most dangerous regions in the world.

After the recent ISIS beheadings of James Foley, Steven Sotloff, and David Haines, there’s been increased awareness of the dangers faced by freelance journalists covering conflicts. Allison Shelley wrote a great Op-Ed for the LA Times about the issue: The dangerous world of freelance journalism. As with much of the other discussion, Shelley’s piece looks at the increasing role freelancers play in covering the world’s news and the lack of resources available to freelancers as compared to the support given staff journalists covering conflict (which we’ve covered previously).

Other publications have published articles recently about the issues, as well: The Washington Post, the BBC, CNN (speaking with Tina Carr, director of the Rory Peck Trust), and NBC News. On the Media also has a good look at how imagery of ISIS arrives in American publications, and Fresh Air’s interview with NYT Baghdad Bureau Chief Tim Arango offers a look at how the New York Times covers the group.

Digiday also has a look at how news startups such as Buzzfeed and Vice have been covering ISIS. Vice is a particularly interesting case because they seem to have gotten the closest access to ISIS in their 5-part series on the group. Vice editors spoke with the Huffington Post about how Vice was able to gain access.

PBS MediaShift also has a great article on the subject of the dangers of freelance journalism in Syria, though it was published in April 2014. Vanity Fair’s piece on the disappearances of Austin Tice and James Foley, published in May 2014, is also worth a read.

And while you’re at it, read Tom A. Peter‘s article in the New Republic: Why I Decided War Reporting Was No Longer Worth the Risk.

Legal battles continue over ownership of Vivian Maier’s work

The legal case to determine whether Mr. Baille is Maier’s closest relative has now set in motion a process that Chicago officials say could take years and could result in Maier’s works’ being pulled from gallery inventories and museum shows until a determination is made.”
The Heir’s Not Apparent, New York Times

I wrote about the legal issues surrounding the rightful heir and owner of Vivian Maier‘s substantial body of work last year. The New York Times just published an overview of where the subject stands now, detailing a legal case filed in June 2014 which might force John Maloof and other owners of Maier’s negatives to cease publications and exhibitions of the work. In short, Virginia lawyer David C. Deal, himself a former photographer, thought that something wasn’t right in the way Maier’s copyright had been handled and searched for relatives of the nanny.

Screenshot of VivianMaier.com, the John Maloof collection
Screenshot of VivianMaier.com, the John Maloof collection

Maloof, owner of the largest collection of Maier’s negatives and prints (and producer and director of Finding Vivian Maier and countless exhibitions), had previously found a person in France who he’d thought was Maier’s closest living relative and agreed on an undisclosed settlement for the rights to the work. Deal believes he has found a closer relative of Maier’s, again in France, and now represents that person in a court case to determine whether or not he is the photographer’s closest heir. It’s a tangled case that will likely take years, but at the heart is a copyright issue.

The Vivian Maier industry (in the form of books, exhibitions, prints for sale, movies, television programs, and so on) is already worth millions of dollars. If this new possible heir is determined to be the rightful owner of the copyright, it could lead to substantial copyright infringement claims relating to most every instance of Vivian Maier’s work that has been seen in public. According to the New York Times, the state public administrator’s office in Cook County, Illinois, created an estate for Vivian Maier in July and warned Maloof and others selling the work that there may be future lawsuits over Maier’s work.

Hyperallergic also recently published a couple of articles regarding the legal issues surrounding Vivian Maier’s archive that are worth a read: Making Sense of the Legal Battle Over Vivian Maier’s Artworks and A Vivian Maier Collector Opens Up About Posthumous Printing, Maier’s Only Heir, and Her Legacy.

Buy prints to support A Photo A Day and go to GeekFest Sept. 12-14 in Philadelphia

Support APAD by bidding on prints
Support APAD by bidding on prints

Both Matt and I have participated in the A Photo A Day community (APAD) over the years. It’s a wonderful community, run by Melissa Lyttle, of (mostly) photojournalists who look at each others’ work on an email listserv. Now, APAD has become a registered non-profit and will be offering grants to photographers to work on projects. I’m happy to see this development; money for projects is always a good thing. You can help out by bidding on prints from a wide-ranging group of photographers. The auction goes until September 16 and features the work of: Alan Berner, Barbara Davidson, Kendrick Brinson, Matt Eich, Preston Gannaway, Todd Heisler, Ariana Lindquist, Susana Raab, and others. For some of the work available, these are likely the lowest prices you’ll ever see. Check out the auction here.

A Photo A Day
APhotoADay

And while you’re at it, consider going to APAD’s annual GeekFest in Philadelphia Sept. 12 – 14, 2014. It’ll be my first GeekFest, but everything I hear about previous years is that it’s an experience not to be missed. For me, it will be an opportunity to finally meet many photographers around the US whom I’ve only known through email and social media. But even if you aren’t a member of APAD, it should be a great weekend. There’s a full roster of talks and presentations, including Ed Kashi, April Saul, Kainaz Amaria, Sara Lewkowicz, David Maialetti, Holly Andres, J. Kyle Keener, Luanne Dietz, and Vince Musi. Saturday night will also be the book launch of Sol Neelman’s Weird Sports 2.

As you can see from the schedule, it’s a full weekend, and if you buy a ticket this week, it’s only $100 (next week it goes to $125). You can get more details in the GeekFest Philly facebook group.