The Talent: Stefan Djordjevic

I’ve known Stefan – or Steki to his friends – for a few years through mutual friends in Belgrade. I first met him at a screening of the Serbian film Tilva Roš, which was a dramatization of his real life experience growing up in the city of Bor, Serbia. In part because of his experience on set and becoming friends with the filmmakers, Stefan decided to go to film school and pursue cinematography and documentary photography. He recently showed me a short film he made in Bor, and it was enchanting.

“Journey” is a story about an engine driver who travels the same route for eight hours a day. He doesn’t see that route in the same way we experience it, because the imagination is the only thing he has in his monotonous surroundings.


Stefan Djordjevic was born in Bor, a copper mine town in Eastern Serbia, where he started in the skateboarding scene with couple of friends. Their story was documented in the feature movie called Tilva Roš, directed by Nikola Lezaic. He is currently studying cinematography on Faculty of Dramatic Arts. He always had a passion for documentary photography.

See more of Stefan Djordjevic’s work on his Instagram or Vimeo pages.

We receive a lot of submissions of projects to feature on dvafoto and we want to highlight some of the fantastic work we see. Please get in contact if you have a body of work you’d like to share.

Remembering Journalists Killed in 2014

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It was another tragic year for journalism, with dozens of colleagues – and a few friends – killed while doing their work.

In May we received news that Camille LePage was killed while on assignment in the Central African Republic. The same month Cesuralab’s Andy Rocchelli was killed in Ukraine. This summer saw high-profile murders of Western journalists in Syria, where we lost James Foley and Steven Sotloff. Dozens more photographers, journalists and media workers have also been targeted and killed in that and many more countries worldwide.

The Committee to Protect Journalists has reported that in 2014 60 journalists killed were because of their profession alongside 11 media workers who died and a further 18 deaths whose motive is unconfirmed. See their report for detailed information and statistics about all of the journalists who were killed this year, and other reports going back to 1992.

As the CPJ says in the infographic we’ve reposted above, keep the sacrifices of our colleagues in mind as you think back at all of the wonderful reporting and photographs of 2014.

UNC reaches settlement with Justin Cook over copyright infringement, will also hold public forum about creative rights

This is wonderful news. After our post–one of this site’s most shared posts–on Justin Cook‘s futile attempts to get the University of North Carolina to acknowledge and correct its infringing usage of one of his photos, the University and Cook have reached a settlement. In a public statement on facebook, Cook wrote:

Yesterday The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and I came to a resolution. They agreed to pay my fee for their use of my image, and I agreed to drop my copyright claim on the condition that the Department of Psychology collaborates with me, the UNC School of Law, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, the Media Law Center and others to hold an interdisciplinary public forum about the importance of creative rights.

This resolution is a win for everyone that is more meaningful than what any lawsuit could have afforded us, and it’s consistent with UNC’s core values. A community of impassioned friends and strangers united and pushed us to this huge victory that will further build community and foster conversation. That’s The Carolina Way!

Justin Cook, 5 November 2014

This is, indeed, a win for everyone. Cook’s issues with non-payment and infringement have been resolved and the greater community, including the infringing parties, will be working together to educate the public about the rights of creative workers, which I’m sure will include coverage of how to respect the copyright of photographers. I don’t think I could’ve imagined a better outcome.

I’m especially happy for this news. I’ve known Justin Cook basically since my start as a photojournalist, when we spent time together at the Flint Journal in Michigan. He’s a heck of a nice guy and a great photographer. Make sure to check out his portfolio and his most recent project, Made In Durham, a look at the effects of homicide, incarceration and gentrification in Durham, North Carolina.