Kubrick treasure trove: Museum puts thousands of director’s LOOK assignment photos online

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Screenshot of Stanley Kubrick collection at the Museum of the City of New York

The Museum of the City of New York has unveiled an online collection of ~5000 of Stanley Kubrick’s photos from his time on staff at LOOK magazine between 1945 and 1950. While not quite as easily searchable as Yale’s FSA project, there’s a lot of fun to be had just clicking from page to page. Small collections of Kubrick’s photography have been passed around on blogs over the years (here or here) but this collection includes 129 of the young Kubrick’s assignments. And while only about 5,000 of the images are online now, the collection totals about 15,000 pictures. Oh, and you can order pretty affordable prints from the collection.

Here’s what the museum has to say about the collection:

Between 1945 and 1950, Stanley Kubrick worked as a staff photographer for LOOK magazine. He was not yet Kubrick, the famous film director; he was just Stanley, the kid from the Bronx with an uncanny photographic sensibility. Only 17 years old when he joined the magazine’s ranks, he was by far its youngest photographer. Kubrick often turned his camera on his native city, drawing inspiration from the variety of personalities that populated its spaces. Photographs of nightclubs, street scenes, and sporting events were amongst his first published images, and in these assignments, Kubrick captured the pathos of ordinary life in a way that belied his young age. The Museum’s collection contains 129 of Kubrick’s assignments for the magazine, encompassing more than 15,000 individual images, the vast majority of them never published.

If you want to see the influence of Kubrick’s photography in his films, you’d do well to find a copy of his early noir The Killing. IMDB has a few stills to give an idea of the look of the film.

And while we’re on the subject of Kubrick, here are a couple posts from the past few years on his work: Kubrick’s centered single-point perspective, and Capturing historic light in film.

via reddit

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