Remembering James Foley, part 2

RememberingJim.org
RememberingJim.org

The day after James Foley’s tragic death, we collected a number of remembrances written by friends and colleagues.  Many more have been published since the news first came out, and we thought it’d be good to link to those here.

Since Foley’s death, there has been much written about freelancers covering war, government response to kidnapping, what was and can be done to save Foley and others held captive in Syria and elsewhere, the dangers faced by local journalists, and what it means to publish gruesome images released by organizations with agendas. It’s impossible to link to them all, but here are a few that I’ve found interesting:

  1. James Foley’s Killing Highlights Debate Over Ransom
  2. James Foley’s killers pose many threats to local, international journalists
  3. James Foley’s Choices
  4. The Men Who Killed James Foley
  5. Should Twitter Have Taken Down the James Foley Video?
  6. James Foley Among Many Young, Close-Knit Freelance War Reporters
  7. James Foley is a reminder why freelance reporting is so dangerous
  8. James Foley and fellow freelancers: exploited by pared-back media outlets
  9. Did New York tabloids go too far by printing gruesome images of James Foley’s execution?
  10. How to Take a Picture of a Severed Head [← This one was published before news of Foley’s killing but fits in line with the discussion of publishing images released by terrorist organizations, governments, etc.]

Meanwhile, over the weekend, tremendous news arrived that Peter Theo Curtis, a journalist missing since 2012, had been released. He was apparently held by an Al Qaeda affiliate there after his abduction from Turkey near the Syrian Border.

Steven Sotloff, the other American journalist seen in the Foley execution video, remains in peril. The Committee to Protect Journalists notes that 69 journalists have been killed since 2012, and an estimated 20 journalists, primarily Syrian, are presumed missing there.

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